Boston: Where Everybody Knew Our Name

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Boston: Where Everybody Knew Our Name

You’ve come a long way baby!

A couple of weeks ago I walked the Freedom Trail in Boston – an interesting experience for a child educated on the American Revolution from British text books! This wrapped up a marvelous time for netlogx in Boston at the MESConference – our first national conference with a booth.

My prior blog (Conference Countdown) outlined the many activities needing to be considered in preparing for our debut. Our internal Project Management Office (PMO) created a wonderful Statement of Work (SOW) that outlined clearly our goals and expectations for the team attending so we were truly prepped.

Sunday morning bright and early we flew out of Indy to Boston. Check-in was smooth and then we headed to the convention to set up our booth. Transferable skills (see The Beauty of Transferable Skills) again came to the fore when we had staff with prior retail skills steam our backdrop in record time before it went up.

As we headed back to the hotel I was asked if I was proud and, of course, I was although there was a slight hesitation that we were entering a new stage and perhaps getting ahead of ourselves. I’ve read the management books and know this is a very female view of business ownership – under selling ourselves –however, in my defense it is also a call back to my English roots – keep calm, carry on and don’t boast! Anyway we had fun at the opening event and met old friends and friends of friends so all was good and our booth looked promising as we headed into the conference proper.

Monday we attended some great sessions and I had the pleasure of sitting at our booth hearing our netlogx story articulated by our team members and seeing our luggage spotter start to appear on bags around the hall (see Instinct is Priceless). I also connected with a fellow speaker at my session, Peter Mork, and we found points to work on for a focused session.

Tuesday saw both netlogx’ partners present and the god’s were kind having my session in the afternoon after caffeine kicked in. We both got great feedback internally from our team but also ongoing discussions with attendees. The number of green luggage spotters was growing too as was the friendly “you’re with netlogx – the green company” banter.

Wednesday Tom DiMartino knocked it out of the park with his lighthearted approach to the serious business of procurement and we had inquiries about him as well as our opinions on Andrew Luck’s chances with the Colts. The finale saw Jim Wang, CIO of Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System (AHCCS), and our own Phil Canada who made MITA 3.0 and Six Sigma funny and get the group out 5 minutes early for good spots in the lunch line!

All our presentations are available on our website (http://netlogx.com/mesconference/) but you will need to make special arrangements to see the wall used as an interactive graph feature delivered.

Thank you to each and every one who stopped by our booth or attended our presentations.  We look forward to ongoing conversations throughout the year and seeing you in Charleston, SC in 2013!

A book I’m reading for pleasure:

 War Brides by Helen Bryan –

On a personal note my own Aunty Audrey, my namesake, was a war bride who moved to New York City in 1945 with her GI husband, Bruce, who’d been a bomber mechanic at the American airbase in our home town of Warrington, England.

Aunty Audrey’s Wedding: June 19, 1945

A book I’m reading for business:

Good to Great and the Social Sectors by Jim Collins

What I’m listening to on my iPod:

Save Me San Francisco by Train

Quote:

For Boston who else but a quote from Cliff Clavin from the iconic television show Cheers,“Yeah, well Normie, it is the information age. We can receive up to minute stock prices, medical breakthroughs, political upheavals from all around the globe, ‘course we’d have to turn off the cartoons first.”

 

By | 2016-12-05T11:14:20+00:00 September 27th, 2012|Categories: Audrey's Observations, Uncategorized|Comments Off on Boston: Where Everybody Knew Our Name

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