Monthly Archives: June 2016

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Interview with Navi Kaur

Navi is a millennial and she has been a netlogx employee approaching one year Navi what brings you joy? I like simple pleasures. A good cup of coffee, especially when I wake in the morning. It is my go to comfort, sometimes consumed enjoying the view of the yard, while contemplating life or what is [...]

By | 2016-12-05T11:03:16+00:00 June 29th, 2016|Categories: Interviews|Comments Off on Interview with Navi Kaur

The Curious Case for “Welfare” by Jim Dunn

During the May 22 – 25 APSHA National Health and Human Services 2016 Summit, I was struck by the use of the word “welfare” and in particular by whom.  Over the past 20+ years “welfare” has been supplanted by the more politically correct terms of “human services” or “social services”.  I have to admit that [...]

By | 2016-06-21T05:40:08+00:00 June 23rd, 2016|Categories: Uncategorized|Comments Off on The Curious Case for “Welfare” by Jim Dunn

Communication

com·mu·ni·ca·tion kəˌmyo͞onəˈkāSH(ə)n/ noun the imparting or exchanging of information or news."direct communication between the two countries will produce greater understanding" means of connection between people or places, in particular. synonyms:       transmission, conveyance, divulgence, disclosure; More Did you know that there is even a cynical piece of wisdom about communication called ‘Wiio’s Law’ which says [...]

By | 2016-12-05T11:03:17+00:00 June 5th, 2016|Categories: Audrey's Observations, Uncategorized|Comments Off on Communication

Sense and Symposium by Mark Lambert

In ancient Greece, a symposium was essentially a drinking party where invited guests would come together and partake in heightened intellectual conversations around a certain topic.  For instance, in Plato’s Symposium, he recounts an evening where seven people delivered speeches on their interpretation of the true meaning of love. While each speaker had a vastly [...]

By | 2016-12-05T11:03:20+00:00 June 2nd, 2016|Categories: netlogx Noodles|Comments Off on Sense and Symposium by Mark Lambert